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St. Jude Medical

October 30th, 2014
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Hello doctor. I am 23 years old, why does my heart beats start increasing when I get into the hot shower? And it happens at least once a day And this always freaks me out. It just started when I had my Period this month and it was really bad and really heavy. I don't know what to do. I am really worried about this? Please suggest me?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Thank you for your question. When you take a hot shower, our blood pressure can go down because the blood vessels around our body and skin begin to dilate. When the blood pressure drops, then our heart will beat faster and more forceful. Usually this is the cause of an elevation in heart rate with a hot shower. You can try to take a shower with warm water or minimize the time you spend in the hot shower. With your period, changes in the hormone levels in the body can alter the way your blood vessels dilated and constrict. If your heart begins to beat suddenly in other occasions that to you seems abnormal or out of place, you should talk with your doctor. We often use heart monitors that you wear from days to weeks that tell us exactly what the heart is doing when you get your symptoms

Hi.my father had a minor stroke one year back. All the treatments were done he has been prescribed with some medicine by doctors. Somewhat his condition improved, most of the times while eating he complains that he feels bitterness in any food (lack of taste). Earlier we thought it was due to the effect of medicines but this bitterness still continues what it could be? Please suggest me??
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Although relatively rare, people can experience change in taste after a stroke, from the stroke itself. The mechanism of eating and taste are complex and if any of the signals required for this process are interrupted with a stroke, then the taste experience can be altered. We usually hope to see an improvement in symptoms over the 6 months after a stroke, but all patients are different. In addition to the stroke, many medications do cause a change in taste, particularly those that are used to control heart rhythms or seizure activity. For heart rhythms, the most common drugs that effect tastes after first propafenone and then to a lesser extent flecainide.

Hi.My heart skips beats a lot. I have been facing this problem since 9 years. Sometimes it goes so frequent. I am very scared about this. When they do skip my chest pounds and an unusual feeling up near my throat as well. When i do get them- usually about 3 maybe 4 in a row, i feel quite weak. They have as i said been like this for quite a few years now. Once i counted while in a doctor surgery and I had a least 20 of them. They have been suggested that its normal a heartbeat is a must for a human being and it shouldn't t skip at all and I really don't agree about this. What could be my problem? Please explain??
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Before saying that your symptoms are normal or potentially serious, we typically need to understand what is causing your symptoms. We usually do this with a heart monitor that you can wear up to many weeks that activates when you push a button and/or if an abnormal heart rhythm occurs. If there is an abnormal heart rhythm, we also usually want to get an understanding of the mechanical function of your heart muscle and valves. We do this with an ultrasound of the heart. We all feel our hearts differently, so sometimes mild symptoms can be associated with very serious heart problems and then in other people very severe symptoms can develop with little to no heart problems. The most common cause of skipped beats is actually extra beats. We can get extra beats from the upper heart chambers (atrium) called premature atrial contractions (PACs) or from the bottom chambers (ventricles) called premature ventricular contractions. When we get an extra beat that comes early we often do not feel it. The heart will then pause before the next normal beat is delivered. This allows the heart to have extra time to fill up with blood to make up for the early extra beat. This pause however makes you feel like your heart missed a beat. We all experience extra beats, but some people can have a lot of them to the point they can occur every other beat. We usually use a heart monitor to make sure that your symptoms truly are from extra beats, and if so, how many you are having and from what location.

Hello sir. I am getting irregular heartbeat, which is quite uncomfortable but not painful, it makes me feel light headed, felling of pulse strongly in throat, apart from this I am OK and it changes all the time it's very difficult to explain. It will do a few repetitions of one rhythm and then change to another, or just one strange beat and then change and I can feel this feel for hours sometimes. At the moment it is doing a handful of beats where you get a normal bum-bum followed by a shallow, faster bum-bum, every beat, and then change. The other rhythm is where my heart will miss a beat, and then do a hard beat this can be just one or carry on for ages. I have told to my family doctor without even knowing about the symptoms they have suggested that it was normal. . I'm quite aware that if there was anything seriously wrong then I would probably be very ill, but does anyone else recognize these symptoms? Kindly help me?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Before saying that your symptoms are normal or potentially serious, we typically need to understand what is causing your symptoms. We usually do this with a heart monitor that you can wear up to many weeks that activates when you push a button and/or if an abnormal heart rhythm occurs. If there is an abnormal heart rhythm, we also usually want to get an understanding of the mechanical function of your heart muscle and valves. We do this with an ultrasound of the heart. We all feel our hearts differently, so sometimes mild symptoms can be associated with very serious heart problems and then in other people very severe symptoms can develop with little to no heart problems.

Hello doctor, i have normal EKG, normal stress EKG, normal echo test, heart beat 65-75, average BP 120/83. I have a strong heart beats so that I can feel a pulse in my chest .especially when I am lying. . Is it normal to have strong heart beats with a feel of pulse in the chest on lying down? Please suggest me.?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

The most common cause of a loud or strong heart beat while lying down is extra beats. We can get extra beats from the upper heart chambers (atrium) called premature atrial contractions (PACs) or from the bottom chambers (ventricles) called premature ventricular contractions. When we get an extra beat that comes early, the heart will pause before the next normal beat is delivered. This allows the heart to have extra time to fill up with blood to make up for the early extra beat. The heart that has extra time to fill up can give a much stronger beat that in can be felt and cause a lot of symptoms.. We all experience extra beats, but some people can have a lot of them to the point they can occur every other beat. We usually use a heart monitor that you wear overnight to see what is causing the symptoms, and if it is extra beats, how many you are having and from what location they arise. These beats often occur throughout the day, but a night there are less distractions and you may be more aware of them. Also, when we lie down our hearts fall against our chest walls (particularly when we lie down on our left side) and then the strong beat, after the early extra beat, can be felt in the chest wall.

Hello sir/madam I am 45 years old. Is it possible to hear your heartbeat outside of your body? Recently my husband heard a heart beats outside the body. We were about to go to sleep when we started hearing a thump noise, It was coming from my chest. I did not feel kind of pain, nor dizziness, any symptoms besides the feeling of every thump. I took my blood pressure and it was normal. My heart rate was 84. Every time I changed positions or moved the noise would stop but as soon as I relaxed we would hear it again. I have a prolapse mistral valve. Could it be related to that? Kindly suggest me?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Typically we donít hear our hearts without the help of an instrument. For this reason as physicians we use a stethoscope. People that have certain mechanical heart valves often can heart their hearts and others in the room may be able to as well. Mitral valve prolapse alone cannot be heart outside of the body. Heart specialists can recognize a certain heart sound that suggests prolapse, but this takes a stethoscope, a quite room, and years of experience. In some people that have prolapsed the valve can leak, a sound we call a murmur. Most murmurs require a stethoscope. An ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram) can help your physician understand your mitral valve, the extent of the prolapsed, and if the valve leaks. The most common cause of a loud heart beat at night is extra beats. We can get extra beats from the upper heart chambers (atrium) called premature atrial contractions (PACs) or from the bottom chambers (ventricles) called premature ventricular contractions. When we get an extra beat that comes early, the heart will pause before the next normal beat is delivered. This allows the heart to have extra time to fill up with blood to make up for the early extra beat. The heart that has extra time to fill up can make a much stronger sound that in thin people or in a very quiet room can sometimes be heard outside the body. We all experience extra beats, but some people can have a lot of them to the point they can occur every other beat. We usually use a heart monitor that you wear overnight to see what is causing the symptoms, and if it is extra beats, how many you are having and from what location they arise.

HI. My father is a 54 years old,. He is an a-fib patient? He has been in AFIB for 11 days now. He is planning to go for a trip. He is going to get shocked out of it in another week. He is on blood thinners (coumidin) because of artificial aortic and mitral valve. His INR/Proteime level is 3.5. , he has asthma. Can my Father die of a-fib? Please let me know your opinion?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Atrial fibrillation does not increase your fathers risk of death if we take the appropriate steps to treat it. The first is that we need to prevent stroke. In your father, this was already being done since he has artificial heart valves. Next, like an muscle in our bodies, the heart muscle if it beats too fast can fatigue and develop what we call heart failure. We can prevent this by using medications that slow his heart rate at rest to below 100 beats per minute or as in the case of your father shocking the heart to restore his heart rhythm to normal. If we prevent stroke and heart failure, then atrial fibrillation treatment is largely to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life.

Hello sir, I am sanaya. My sister is 7 years old and she is saying that her heart is beating too fast and has shortness of breath. Recently we have been to hospital and the doctor's was not helpful and just suggested to visit the heart specialist but we have an appointment on Monday. I am really worried about this. Could you please give information about this?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

It is a good idea to see a heart specialists. When young children have symptoms such as your sisters, we need to get a basic understanding of her electrical and mechanical heart function. We do this with an electrocardiogram and an echocardiogram. If these are normal, then we often use a heart monitor that she can activate when she feels her symptoms. These monitors help us to understand if an abnormal heart rhythm is causing her symptoms.

Hello doctor. My grandmother is 87 years old. Recently he had a stroke 7 days ago, refused medical intervention because of the severity and also her being 87 years old. I just want to know is she suffering from Heart attack if so how long. Is there any reason to be worried?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

I hope your grandmother is doing better and recovering from her stroke. A stroke can be caused from many different sources. A heart attack is typically not one of them. If a heart attack does lead to a stroke, it often is because of the heart attack causing atrial fibrillation of a severe weakening of the heart muscle. In our center, if somebody has had a stroke with often look at the heart function and monitor the heart rhythm looking for atrial fibrillation. We also do imaging of the head and neck to see if there are abnormalities (narrowings) in the arteries that may have resulted in the stroke. Depending on what is found, there are different treatment approaches. For example, if your grandmother has atrial fibrillation then we often start an anticoagulant such as warfarin to minimize risks of having more strokes. We can only use this type of therapy if there is not bleeding or fall risks. If she has a narrowed artery in her neck, then the treatment would be to try an open the artery.

I am a 64yr old make with persistent AFIB. Diagnosed Sep 2011, 4 cardioversions, none worked for more than a little while. Taking Pradaxa and Bystolic (for rate control). I was told no ablation because I am in persistent AFIB, chance of success very low. Symtoms are mild, some shortness of breath and water retention (take Lasix). ANy thoughts?
2012-05-28 Answered By : Dr. T. Jared Bunch

Success rates after ablation are lower if you are in persistent atrial fibrillation. However, in centers that are comfortable with ablation in those with persistent atrial fibrillation they are often 60-70%. In our center, we usually have a cut-off of 3 years to exclude patients for ablation. We will consider doing an ablation in patients with a longer history of persistent atrial fibrillation, but we often do a cardioversion on our strongest drug (amiodarone) to see if we can restore sinus rhythm before considering an ablation. From my perspective, you have only been in persistent atrial fibrillation for 8 months and the cardioversions did work, although for a short period, so an ablation is a viable option for you.

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No.of Questions Answered in All Sessions: 929

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