Cardiofront Logo
Jafib Logo
St. Jude Medical

December 09th, 2016
Submit Manuscript
Meet the Expert
Enter your question
Browse All Questions Answered upto now
OR
Search
     ... 34 35 36 37 [38] 39 40 41 42 ...    
I have lone afib and have had it for about 5 years. I have tried most of the drugs with no success and experienced bad side effects. Last year I was having about 3 events a month. This year I started taking ginger capsules (500mg) before meals and so far have been mostly afib free except for a couple of occasion when I forgot to take them. As you can appreciate I am keen to share this news with you. Do you know why this works? I have read that ginger works the same way as ibuprofen in reducing inflammation.
2013-07-15 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

Many thanks for this interesting and enlightening observation. If you search the internet, you can find several reports that raw ginger (or drinking ginger tea) has helped others to reduce their AF. However, there are very few, if any, scientific studies on this subject yet. Thus, it is now clear how ginger may work. However, if it works for you please continue (in moderation!). Watch the literature for further developments, and thanks again for your email.

I am a 63 yr old male with asymptomatic, paroxsymal atrial fibrillation and chads2vasc of 0. My cardiologist prescribed dilitiazem and low does aspirin after echo, stress echo, 24 hr holter, ecg. Recently I consulted with an ep and he administered a 7 day holter that showed I am in afib 30% of the time, with longest episode of 12 hours. The ep recommended that I start anticoagulants. . My cardiologist had previously told me he would start me on anticoagulants when I was 65. I would like a second opinion. Thanks.
2013-07-15 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

This is a very important question. In general, most practitioners anticoagulate based on the CHA2DS2VASc score, and not based on AF burden per se. Thus, since your CHA2DS2VASc score is zero, most practitioners would agree with using no agent or aspirin - even though you are in AF 30% of the time. The opposite argument is also true - in a patient with a high CHA2DS2VASc score (2 or more), most practitioners would recommend anticoagulation with warfarin or a newer agent regardless of the precise amount of AF. In summary, based on this information your cardiologist\'s opinion seems sound.

I am a 63 year old male with asymptomatic, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. My cardiologist prescribed diltiazem and low dose aspirin. My CHADS2VASc is 0. I recently went to an ep who did a 7 day holter monitor which showed I am in Afib 30% of the time with longest episode of 12 hours. The EP recommended anticoagulation. I wanted to know if there are any studies on anticoagulation recommendations and AF burden and if not are their guidelines that ep\'s use or is it based on personal experience. In addition I would like a second opinion if possible. Prior to going to the EP I discussed anticoagulation with my cardiologist and he said he would start when I was 65.
2013-07-14 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

This is a very important question, and Yes, there are several studies on this topic. In general, most practitioners anticoagulate based on the CHA2DS2VASc score, and not based on AF burden per se. Thus, if your CHA2DS2VASc score were high you would be anticoagulated with warfarin or a newer agent regardless of the precise amount of AF you have. Accordingly, since your CHA2DS2VASc score is zero, many would consider placing you on no agent or potentially aspirin even though your AF is 30% of the time. Thus, your cardiologist\'s opinion seems very sound.

When you feel a skip beat how do we know it has originated from the Atria ...or the Ventricle... or it is a PAC with a ventricle response.? I have from time to time felt them inside the upper stomach level just below the last left or right rib. I have had event monitor recorder hooked but to no avail even though I have marked the precise time of the day when they occur.
2013-07-14 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

Many thanks for this question. The short answer is that you may never be fully accurate in determining if your skipped beats come from the atria or ventricles. There are some \"classical\", \"old school\" tips, but these are not fully reliable. For instance, if the beats go away when you are exercising, they were previously felt to be ventricular. However, this is not always true, and one could have atrial and ventricular beats. It is odd that the event monitor has not picked these up. It is worth going through the tracings and your diary log (of symptom times) with your Doctor. Please make sure that the time on the event monitor is the same as the time on your watch. If, after checking all of this, your \"skipped beats\" do not correlate to any rhythm irregularity, then your symptoms are likely from something else.

Dr. Narayan, can you tell us what FIRM studies are currently underway and when you expect to release additional results from these studies. Also, do you suspect FIRM procedures are best used in conjunction with PVI ablation or that they will be equally effective as a stand alone procedure.
2013-07-14 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

Thanks for the question and the interest in FIRM. Actually, several FIRM studies are underway, with the major ones at the moment led by Dr. John Miller, Chief of Arrhythmia Medicine at Indiana University. Several more are expected in the near future. FIRM is being used by several groups with PVI, but also as standalone FIRM-only. Both appear very successful. Since new data is being gathered, it is worth each patient discussing these options with their doctor to ensure the most up-to-date decisions.

I am 18 years old. I have been getting palpitations and they occur frequently. I donít smoke, don t drink coffee or alcohol very much. When I go to gym the heart monitors on the cardio equipment always flash with warnings that my heart rate is too high. It averages at about 184 beats per minute when i power walk. Am I in risk of heart attack? Kindly suggest me?
2013-07-10 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

This is something that your doctor should advise you about. First, it is important to know if you have any other symptoms when you have your palpitations, or when your heart rate goes up to 184. These symptoms may include chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, lightheadedness or if you have blacked out or nearly blacked out. Second, you should record what was happening when you get palpitations. When you see your doctor, this information will be useful. I would definitely try cutting out caffeine and alcohol completely, to see if that makes things better. Third, these symptoms may reflect many things: they may be normal (at your age, your maximum heart rate with exercise may be up to 200 beats/minute), they may reflect a heart rhythm abnormality, or they may represent one of several problems with other parts of your body that are causing rapid heart rates. I would avoid going to the gym or pushing yourself too much with exercise until you have discussed this with your doctor.

Hi. I have Palpitation and have been suffering from Saturday midnight. I met the heart therapist and they say that my heart is normal due to ecg. Whenever i want to sleep there is palpitation. I didnít sleep for 3 days. it will be helpful if anyone can provide the information about this?
2013-07-10 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

This is something that your doctor can definitely advise about. You should contact your doctor immediately if you have any other symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, weakness of one side of your body or the other side of your body, lightheadedness or if you have blacked out or nearly blacked out. If you don't have those symptoms, or if you are generally feeling OK, then make an appointment to discuss the ECG and what to do next. Your "palpitations" could be due to many things, and your doctor and you can decide if you should have a longer ECG recording (for a day or longer) to see if the rhythm is abnormal, or if other tests are needed.

Hello Doctor. I am 33years old male. I have been taking Adderall for roughly 8 months. I usually take around 60-80mg a day and that works in a high stress sales environment. I weigh around 155 pounds. Adderall helps me keep up with my heavy work and from the past one week. I have been getting pain in my chest constantly and even if i am on Adderall i can feel a little more pain. Am I in of risk of heart failure? Please suggest
2013-07-10 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

I am concerned about your chest pain. Please see your doctor immediately. If you cannot contact your doctor, then you should go to the Emergency room. From what you are writing, it is unclear if this pain is from the heart, chest wall muscles or some other reason, but there is no reason to take any chances. Let your physician or the ER make the decision if this is a 'simple' problem or not.

Hello Doc. I am now 26 years old.I was diagnosed with ASD at the age of 26 and went for ASD closure 1 month before. I was an athlete and loved to do vigorous activities. But after the operation, I couldn't really do the activities like i used to do. Even if I could them, I will be having some pain and discomforts at my chest . My doctor said that my heart was quite strong. But when I am stressed or tired, I felt like something is wrong with my heart. There was a time when I stayed up all night to finish my work and when I lie down to sleep, I have to make an effort to breath. Why do I experience such things? And is it risky in the future?
2013-06-20 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

Thanks. If you are having difficulty breathing when you try to lie down, then you should go to the ER. If things are not that severe, they you should still contact your doctor straight away to discuss this. There are many possibilities, and only your care giver who knows your full history can go through these possibilities with for.

Hi. My father is 94 years old had a blackout whilst standing and fell beginning of June 2012. He now has a hangman s fracture and now showing very visible signs of congenital heart failure . His legs are leaking badly. He also has good days when he is ultra alert and other times spaced out. How long can this go on for? He signed his own advanced health directive with his doctor a few years ago. He does not want to be kept artificially alive. How long can he go on for in this condition? please suggest
2013-06-20 Answered By : Dr. Sanjiv M Narayan, MD, PhD, FHRS

Thanks for your question. However, this is a very, very difficult one. In general, it is very difficult to "predict" how long any particular condition can go on for. Instead, it would be more useful for you and your father to have a long discussion with his doctor(s) to address all of these concerns. It is possible that altered medications for his heart failure may improve his health.

No.of Questions Asked in All Sessions: 1092
No.of Questions Answered in All Sessions: 1092

Disclaimer

1. JAFIB and the invited expert reserve the right to decline any question. The question declined will not appear in the list of questions asked.
2. The questions or advice from the expert can not be considered as alternatives to your clinician's advice. This discussion is only for educational/informational use. Your EP doctor is THE person to advice you on treatment and management of your condition.

Feedback : Your suggestion on this new initiative are much appreciated. Please write to the managing editor(editor@jafib.com) about your feedback on "Meet the Expert".
Jafib
Powered by - Jafib Team   Privacy Policy | Site Map
hits counter